Thursday, December 7, 2017

More eco-dyeing

There are two things I love about eco-dyeing papers. First, I get a lot of inspiring papers to draw on. Second, it's such a delightful surprise unwrapping the bundles after the dye process.

This time I did a few different things. I used some toned papers as well as the white ones. I added a couple of rusty items to the dye-bath, having been advised that it would give some very dark darks. I dyed some Opus tiles and other larger papers; I had to roll them in order to fit my roasting pan! Here's part of the results, laid out on the dining table to dry.

Gotta love those onion skins! Such lovely bright colors. They give anything from a pale yellow, through oranges, to dark rusty reds. Here are some examples.
An onion skin splayed flat.
Onion skins with other leaves.
Some leaves are better than others for leaving lovely marks. Maples are good.
 So are oak leaves.
And raspberries.
Some leaves don't leave much of a mark per se, but they're good to block space and leave an empty shape.
Leaves as 'resist'.
I had some purple flowers (what are they!?!) that gave me this!
And something gave me lovely steel grays.

The black edges below are because of the rusty things in the water. There's also onion skins and various leaves.
Rusty metal offers dark darks.
I think this page must have been on the bottom as it got a heavy dose of black! I think it got a little folded too, thus the vertical stripes. I wonder what it will develop into?
Sometimes they come out very simple.
Now I have more fun in store!
You can read my post about my first attempts at eco-dyeing here.

13 comments:

  1. So lovely to see the close up on these babies! I love the whole spectrum - some that clearly look just like leaves right through the abstract others. The dark lined one screams gothic towers to me! And that last simple one is a delight!

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  2. Ummmm...THESE ARE GORGEOUS!! How much fun you will have! Can't wait to see what becomes of them through your beautiful tangling.

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  3. Love your dyed papers. Good job. I especially love the lavender color.
    Hugs

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  4. Did you post how to do this? These are remarkably beautiful as they are, but I would like to understand how you do it!

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    1. Wendy, thanks for the reminder. I've added a link at the bottom of this post to my post about my first attempt.

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    2. Thank you so much! Your latest batch is gorgeous! I really appreciate having the process clarified...I think I may have to try this! Merry Christmas, Margaret!

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  5. Gosh Margaret!! I want to join you for a day in your kitchen! Lovely and so inspiring! Can you please include a link on how to eco dye? Thank you!

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    1. Deanne, I've added a link at the bottom of this post to my post about my first attempt last spring.

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  6. These are great. I’m going to check out your link too! Thank you so much for sharing what you do. It’s a huge help, and I love seeing what you are up to.

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  7. Love your results, Margaret! When you "cook" your paper/leaves bundle, do you place them directly into the roaster or is there a rack onto which your bundle goes? Thanks!

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    1. You can either simmer or steam the bundles. I've only ever tried simmering, in which case the bundles must be covered by the water, thus the use of a brick! (Check out the first blog post.)

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  8. Wow! Gorgeous! I'm itchin' to have another go at this even though I still have several from my last batch. So, you press the onion skins as well as in the bath yes? Thanks so much for sharing this. I cant't wait to see what you do with them. Now, off to search for rusty stuff;-)

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    1. Michele, I tend to want to get as much out of my materials as possible, so I flatten the onion skins, although if they ended up layered perhaps more intense colors would result?

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